KEN-2006-EL-011.jpgThe vibrant water sector self assessment is a tool for identifying strengths and weaknesses within a given country's water+ work. It evaluates how water+ work relates to all three areas of poverty: human condition, social position and enabling environments as well as other elements deemed necessary for "vibrancy" within the water+ sector.
If you are in a country office that is seeking to initiate a discussion on water+, we invite you to take the Assessmentand inform us that you are doing so. It will also tell you how well your work measures up to that of other CARE countries. We will follow up with guidance, resources, and recommendations for improvement and connect you with countries that have done interesting work.


Who's Taken the Vibrant Water Self Assessment?


This table indicates which countries have taken the assessment, where they score relative to others, and what their self identified areas of expertise/experience are. The purpose of the assessment is mainly to encourage reflection, spur improvement and provide a baseline for future changes, however, as a benchmarking tool, it can also help countries assess where they are relative to others. The scores provided below (out of a maximum of 5 waterdrops) are derived from each country's self assessment of achievements. They do not reflect the complexity of each country's water programming but do provide a sense of relative strength.

Countries are encouraged to contact one another directly or through the water team for questions related to the areas of experience/expertise outlined below.
Country
Score (out of 500)
Score (2009/2011)
Score (2012)
Areas of Experience/Expertise
Contact
(contact the Water Team at hpankhurst@care.org unless
otherwise indicated)
Ecuador
260
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water and sanitation governance, water and sanitation quality, water and sanitation coverage, WASH, partnership with local NGOs; private sector.
pedro.carrasco@ec.care.org
Ethiopia
338
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unifying water+ standards across different projects and water+ strategy development; research in gender and water; water quality and governance; working in pastoralist areas
Teshome Lemma TeshomeL@care.org.et
Kenya
272
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school WASH, safe water systems; research related to school WASH and SWS; multiple use systems

Liberia
211
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WASH programing in the rural, peri-urban and post-conflict context
Elmos B. Glay; Tel: +231 6 550 962; email: elmos.glay@co.care.org
Mozambique
171
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rural governance; capacity building; partnership with local NGOs; private sector
Nicholas Dexter
nicholas@care.org.mz
Peru
339
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WASH project management at micro, meso and macro level; WASH related risk management; appropriate WASH technology; rural capacity building with a gender focus; information management systems for WASH; public policy formulation with a participatory focus
Lourdes Mindreau - lmindreau@care.org.peNey Diaz
ndiaz@care.org.pe
Sudan
237

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Work in IDP camps, establishment and capacity building of Water User Committees; use of ferro cement latrine superstructure (Environmental friendly Technology); community managed Solid waste disposal
Richard Data
RData@sudancis.org
Tanzania
225

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Work in community and schools; Water+ partnerships with other NGOs dividing up different roles, linking water+ with VSLA groups, work in pastoralist areas
Dhahia Mbaga Dhahia.Mbaga@co.care.org
Uganda
296

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Work in community and schools, water+ work linked programmatically with other partners and within long-term country program, significant piece of work on cost benefit analysis of different water and sanitation technologies
John Perry
jperry@co.care.org








There is a short report on each of the countries assessement. As an example, see document below for a,summary of Ethiopia's Vibrant Water Assessment .